Super Bowl Ads: Marketers are the Real MVP Once Again

By Ari Brosowsky

The actual Super Bowl game was a dud. But for those casual fans sitting at the edge of their seat clamoring for this year’s crop of over the top ads; they weren’t disappointed. While many will wonder how companies can justify spending more than $5 million dollars for a 30 sec ad slot, but too often do we hear “well, at least the ads were good” or “I am just watching for the ads>” the Super Bowl has become synonymous with two things: eating as much greasy food as possible and debating who will be crowned the marketing king.

These are our top five ads from this year’s big game:

5. bubly: “Michael Bublé vs bubly”

Sparkling water has become a very crowded market recently. So how did bubly (a PepsiCo company) stand out from the likes of LaCroix and others? The answer is Michael Bublé. A debate between him and store patrons about the correct pronunciation of the beverage was a very fun way to introduce four new flavors to bubly’s offering.

4. Bud Light: “Special Delivery”

This year, Bud Light decided to call out their competition directly. In what is being called one of advertising’s best diss tracks, Bud Light specifically calls out both Miller Light and Coors Light for using corn syrup in their brewing process. Shots have certainly been fired as health consciousness has become a hot button focus food and beverage brands. The light beer war continues, we can’t wait to see how it unfolds.

3. Amazon: “Not Everything Makes the Cut”

Self-deprecation was used quite well in this ad. Amazon pokes fun at themselves and everyone else trying to integrate everything under the sun with Alexa, giving us a glimpse into “failed products.” The real winner of this ad is however Harrison Ford and his gravy-loving pup.

2. T-Mobile: “Dad?!”

A big shout out to T-Mobile who had several great commercials, a couple of them even being accompanied by with free Taco Bell and Lyft rides for everyone. It was hard to choose the best of their ad’s, but this one got the biggest laugh. T-Mobile appealed to millennials, who in one way or another have all experienced the challenges of explaining technology to their parents.

1. Washington Post: “Democracy Dies in Darkness”

In its first Super Bowl ad ever, The Washington Post celebrated the important role journalists play in society, and the risks they take to do so. More than a minute long it is narrated by America’s Dad, Tom Hanks. It shows footage of major world events since World War II as well as images of three journalists who have been killed or kidnapped in the course of their work, Austin Tice, Jamal Khashoggi, and Marie Colvin. In a sea of comedy to distract us from reality, The Washington post made a profound message on the current state of affairs.

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